Classrooms

Jacobs Hall

Built 2015. Jacobs Hall, hub of the interdisciplinary Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation, contains 24,000 square feet of design studios and maker labs with access to the latest equipment for rapid prototyping and fabrication.

Building Details

[under construction]

Hilgard Hall

Built 1917. Designed by John Galen Howard, this was one of the first campus buildings to acknowledge the city of Berkeley (by attempting to face both inward and outward at the same time). It was named for Eugene Hilgard, an agriculture professor who founded the University Agricultural Experimental Station. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: The usable entrance is located on the east side at the bottom of a steep exterior ramp...

Hesse Hall

Built 1924. Designed by John Galen Howard and named for the Prussian-born founder of the College of Mechanics, Frederick Godfrey Hesse.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: One entrance (to level one) on the north side enters at grade. None of the entrances provides an automatic opener.

Restrooms: Nearest accessible restrooms are either located in McCone or O'Brien.

Gilman Hall

Built 1917. Daniel Coit Gilman was a geology professor at Yale who became the University of California's second president (1872-75) before going on to found the Johns Hopkins University. The building was designed by John Galen Howard. Room 307, where plutonium was discovered in 1941, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.

Building Details

Floors: 5

Accessible entrances: The main entrance to Gilman Hall is one the west side of the building, located at...

Wheeler Hall

Named for Benjamin Ide Wheeler, university president during Berkeley's "golden years" from 1899-1919. The French Baroque facade includes arched doorways leading into a vaulted auditorium lobby, ionic columns across the middle floors, and a colonnade ornamented with urn-shaped lamps symbolizing, according to designer John Galen Howard, "the light of learning." It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

Floors: 5
Year built: 1917
Accessible entrances: There are two usable...

Zellerbach Hall

Built 1968. The primary fine arts performance space on campus is named for Isadore and Jennie Zellerbach, who contributed $1 million toward its construction. The 2,100-seat main auditorium has witnessed performances by many of the world's most acclaimed orchestras, vocalists, dance companies, and speakers. There is also a 500-seat Playhouse for smaller productions.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Accessible entrances: Zellerbach Hall's main accessible entrance is located on the...

O'Brien Hall

Built 1959. Morrough O'Brien spent two decades as an engineering professor before serving as dean of the College of Engineering from 1948-59. O'Brien Hall houses environmental engineering and the Water Resources Center Archives.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: The main entrance is located on the east side in the O'Brien Breezeway. This entrance provides automatic openers and push plates.

Restrooms: One multiple user...

Soda Hall

Built 1994. Funded by the Y & H Soda Foundation and named in honor of Y. Charles and Helen Soda as a tribute to their commitment to education in the Bay Area. With classrooms, labs, and offices, Soda Hall was designed with its Computer Science residents in mind: its open alcoves encourage informal interactions among students and faculty, and its labs and offices are grouped to foster a team approach to computing innovation. In Soda Hall, "the building is the computer," with advanced networking, wireless capabilities, and access to computer clusters for shared computing power,...

South Hall

Built 1873. The oldest structure on campus, and the only surviving building of the original university nucleus, South Hall was the original home of the College of Agriculture. It once had a near twin, North Hall, situated where the Bancroft Library stands today. The brick structure, designed by Scottish architect David Farquharson, is a rare and distinguished example of the Second Empire style. Over the course of its long history, South Hall has hosted the first physics lab in America (1879), the business school, a temporary museum for the state geological survey, and the persistent...