Labs

2536 Channing Way

Building Details

Floors: 2

Year built: 1895

Accessible entrances: There is a wheelchair lift that serves the first level.

Restrooms: The single user restroom on the first floor provides grab bars, but inadequate dimensions for side transfer.

O'Brien Hall

Built 1959. Morrough O'Brien spent two decades as an engineering professor before serving as dean of the College of Engineering from 1948-59. O'Brien Hall houses environmental engineering and the Water Resources Center Archives.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: The main entrance is located on the east side in the O'Brien Breezeway. This entrance provides automatic openers and push plates.

Soda Hall

Built 1994. Funded by the Y & H Soda Foundation and named in honor of Y. Charles and Helen Soda as a tribute to their commitment to education in the Bay Area. With classrooms, labs, and offices, Soda Hall was designed with its Computer Science residents in mind: its open alcoves encourage informal interactions among students and faculty, and its labs and offices are grouped to foster a team approach to computing innovation.

Donner Laboratory

Built 1942. The lab was funded by William H. Donner, president of the Donner Steel Corp., who donated money to the university for work in nuclear medicine following his son's death from cancer. The Donner Lab was the world's first center for research in the uses of atomic energy in biology and medicine.

Building Details

Floors: 5

Cory Hall

Built 1950. Named for Clarence L. Cory, dean of the College of Mechanics and a faculty member for almost 40 years, Cory had a fifth floor added in 1985, the exterior of which features a computer chip-inspired design motif. The building houses a state-of-the-art electronic micro-fabrication facility and labs devoted to integrated circuits, lasers, and robotics. Cory has the dubious distinction of being the only site bombed twice by "Unabomber" Theodore Kaczynski in the 1980s.

Etcheverry Hall

Built 1964. The first UC-built building on the north side of Hearst Ave., it was named for Bernard Etcheverry, professor of drainage and irrigation and chairman of the department for nearly three decades. It once held a functioning nuclear reactor in its basement and a research wind tunnel, both now dismantled.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Built 1907. Designed by John Galen Howard and financed by Phoebe Apperson Hearst as a memorial to her husband George, "a plain honest man and good miner," silver tycoon, and U.S. senator. The building underwent a massive restoration, completed in 2002, that included cutting-edge seismic retrofitting to protect the building in the event of a major earthquake.

Latimer Hall

Built 1963. Named for Wendell Latimer, dean of the College of Chemistry in the 1940s, the building contains chemistry labs and classrooms. On the plaza southwest of Latimer Hall is a cupola, all that remains of the original chemistry building on campus.

Building Details

Floors: 11

Accessible entrances: The breezeway entrance to the building has usable entrances on both the north and south side of the facility.

Leconte Hall

Built 1924. This was the site of the world's first atom smasher, built in 1931 by Ernest O. Lawrence, Berkeley's first Nobel laureate. With eight Nobel Prizes in physics held by UC Berkeley faculty and four more awarded to Berkeley alumni, LeConte Hall (designed by John Galen Howard) has been home to an impressive array of Nobel-caliber work. The building was named in honor of brothers John and Joseph LeConte, professors of physics and geology who came to Berkeley in 1866 following a stint running the Confederate powder works during the Civil War.

Lewis Hall

Built 1948. Designed by Arthur Brown, Jr., and named for Gilbert Lewis, dean of the College of Chemistry from 1912-41.

Building Details 

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: There are two entrances to the ground level at grade on the west side of the building, one of which provides an automatic opener.