Labs

Li Ka Shing Center

Built 2011. The Li Ka-shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences will make a huge contribution to the advancement of medical research. The facility houses computer scientists, biologists, physicists, engineers, chemists and mathematicians under one roof and enables a collaborative medical approach towards four key medical issues: stem cell research, infectious diseases including HIV and dengue fever, cancer, and neurosciences including Alzheimer’s disease. Several Nobel prize laureates also work in the center.

Life Sciences Addition

Built 1988. Part of a major campus drive to improve facilities for biology studies, the six-story LSA houses 46 laboratory suites for advanced biological research.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Accessible entrances: The accessible entrance is located on the north side of the building and it includes an automatic door opener.

Stanley Hall

Built 2007. Wendell M. Stanley, who won the 1946 Nobel Prize in chemistry, served Berkeley as biochemistry chair (1948-53), virology chair (1958-64), and founder and director of the virus lab (1948-69). Stanley Hall is the Berkeley headquarters for the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3). The office and lab complex supports interdisciplinary teaching and research as part of the campus' Health Science Initiative.

Building Details

Floors: 12

Tan Hall

Built 1996. Named in honor of Tan Kah Kee, a pioneering industrialist and philanthropist in China and Singapore.

Building Details

 Floors: 10

Accessible entrances: The main entrance to the ground (first) floor is usable (provides automatic openers), but the elevators that bring users to other floors are located to the side of the main entrance.

Wurster Hall

Built 1964. Although home to Berkeley's architecture department, Wurster is often voted Berkeley's ugliest building for its Brutalist, bare concrete appearance. But some of the "ugliness" is a result of functionality, like the concrete sunshades over windows to minimize energy costs. It was named for William Wurster, dean of the School of Architecture and its successor, the College of Environmental Design (1950-62), and his wife, lecturer Catherine Bauer Wurster.

Building Details

Floors: 11