Offices

California Hall

Built 1905. The building began life as the campus administration building, a role to which it has somewhat returned after decades of classroom use. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

[under construction]

Sproul Hall

Built 1941. Robert Gordon Sproul graduated from Berkeley in 1913, then worked his way up at his alma mater from cashier to president (1930-58). Sproul was the first Berkeley alumnus and the first native Californian to serve as university president. The neoclassical building, designed by Arthur Brown, Jr., housed the offices of the chancellor and other top administrators until the 1960s, when they were repeatedly occupied by students from the Free Speech Movement. The chancellor subsequently decamped for more-secure California Hall.

Tang Center

Built 1993. A major gift from Hong Kong businessman Jack C.C. Tang, two of whose daughters graduated from Berkeley, helped fund this center for student health care. Among the services available are acute care, radiology, a pharmacy, an optometry clinic, and various counseling services.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Dwinelle Annex

Built 1920. Originally built for military science instruction, the building was designed by campus architect John Galen Howard. It was occupied for a quarter century by the music department (1933-58). In its current incarnation as home to the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, it is conveniently located just steps away from Zellerbach Hall and Dwinelle Hall's Durham Studio Theater.

Building Details

[under construction]

Durant Hall

Built 1911. Originally the Boalt Memorial Hall of Law, it was renamed for Henry Durant, the university's first president in 1870-72, after the law school moved to the southeast side of campus in 1951. Designed by John Galen Howard. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

[under construction]

Donner Laboratory

Built 1942. The lab was funded by William H. Donner, president of the Donner Steel Corp., who donated money to the university for work in nuclear medicine following his son's death from cancer. The Donner Lab was the world's first center for research in the uses of atomic energy in biology and medicine.

Building Details

Floors: 5

Doe Memorial Library

Named for Charles Franklin Doe, who came from Maine in 1857 as a schoolteacher and made his fortune in California. He left a quarter of his estate to the university for construction of a new library. The Beaux Arts building, which features the magnificently restored North Reading Room and the cozy Morrison Library, was the centerpiece of architect John Galen Howard's classical campus ensemble.

Cory Hall

Built 1950. Named for Clarence L. Cory, dean of the College of Mechanics and a faculty member for almost 40 years, Cory had a fifth floor added in 1985, the exterior of which features a computer chip-inspired design motif. The building houses a state-of-the-art electronic micro-fabrication facility and labs devoted to integrated circuits, lasers, and robotics. Cory has the dubious distinction of being the only site bombed twice by "Unabomber" Theodore Kaczynski in the 1980s.

Cesar E. Chavez Student Center

Built 1960. Named in honor of the charismatic founding president of the farm workers' union. The building was once mainly a dining commons and lounge, but in 1990 it was renovated to house various student services.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Blum Hall

Built 2010. The Blum Center’s home is a 22,000 square foot complex completed in 2010. The complex comprises the renovated Naval Architecture Building (designed by John Galen Howard and built in 1914), a new three-story wing and terraces, bridges and plazas connecting the complex to the College of Engineering's Sutardja Dai Hall. The center is a hub for anti-poverty innovation and is named for Richard C. Blum. The center supports faculty research aimed at creating lasting change for the poor around the world.