Offices

Birge Hall

Built 1964. Raymond Thayer Birge had been a professor of physics for 45 years (including 22 as department chair) when the new Birge Hall was named in his honor. Designed by John Warnecke, it replaced Bacon Hall (1881), formerly the university's elegant library and art gallery.

Building Details

Floors: 9

Berkeley Law Building

Built 1966. Originally the name of Durant Hall, which housed the law school before it moved to the southeast corner of campus. Elizabeth Joyce Boalt gave $100,000 in memory of her husband, Judge John Henry Boalt, and 40 state lawyers and judges contributed to make it the "best law school west of the Rockies."

Building Details

Floors: 11

Bechtel Engineering Center

Built 1980. Named for Stephen D. Bechtel, who attended Berkeley before taking the reins of the Bechtel engineering empire. It houses the Kresge Engineering Library, Sibley Auditorium, and student and interdisciplinary studies offices.

Building Details

Floors: 3

Accessible entrances: The main entrance on the level one enters at grade but does not provide an automatic opener. The level 2 south entrance does provide an opener.

Barrows Hall

Built 1964. Named for David Prescott Barrows, political science professor and president of the university from 1919-23.

Barker Hall

Built 1964. Designed by William Wurster and named for Horace Albert Barker, a biochemist specializing in metabolism.

Building Details

[under construction]

Davis Hall

Built 1968. Professor Raymond Davis spent 50 years on the Berkeley faculty and developed the Engineering Materials Laboratory into one of the world's finest. Davis Hall houses the offices of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, including its structural and earthquake engineering labs and teaching facilities.The building’s ground-floor “structures bay” rises two stories, providing space for testing many types of materials and designs, from scale models of California highway overpasses to segments of the Golden Gate Bridge.

Dwinelle Hall

Built 1952. With more than 300,000 square feet of office and classroom space, an infuriating room-numbering system, and a layout often likened to a maze, Dwinelle is the second largest building on campus. It is named for John W. Dwinelle, a UC regent, state assemblyman, and author of the 1868 "Organic Act" establishing the University of California. In the center is Ishi Court, named in honor of a Native American "found" by anthropologist Alfred Kroeber near Oroville, CA, in 1911 and brought to live in the UC Berkeley Museum of Anthropology.

Evans Hall

Built 1971. Original home of much of the computer infrastructure on campus, the building gets poor reviews because of its dark, closed-in design, its massive scale, and its unfortunate location spoiling the main east-west axis of the campus and what was intended to be a spectacular view out to the Golden Gate. Named for Griffith Evans, math department chair from 1934-49.`

Building Details

Floors: 12

Etcheverry Hall

Built 1964. The first UC-built building on the north side of Hearst Ave., it was named for Bernard Etcheverry, professor of drainage and irrigation and chairman of the department for nearly three decades. It once held a functioning nuclear reactor in its basement and a research wind tunnel, both now dismantled.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Haas School of Business

Built 1995 & 2018. The Haas School is a mini-campus of four buildings set around a central courtyard. Two classrooms buildings — Cheit Hall and Chou Hall — house lecture halls, flexible classrooms, seminar rooms featuring or state-of-the-art technology. The Haas campus also includes a computer lab, career management center, several event spaces, Think Cafe, and a business library. The first three buildings — the Student Services Building, the Gerson Bakar Faculty Building, and Cheit Hall — were designed by Charles Moore and opened in 1995.