Offices

O'Brien Hall

Built 1959. Morrough O'Brien spent two decades as an engineering professor before serving as dean of the College of Engineering from 1948-59. O'Brien Hall houses environmental engineering and the Water Resources Center Archives.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: The main entrance is located on the east side in the O'Brien Breezeway. This entrance provides automatic openers and push plates.

Restrooms: One multiple user...

Soda Hall

Built 1994. Funded by the Y & H Soda Foundation and named in honor of Y. Charles and Helen Soda as a tribute to their commitment to education in the Bay Area. With classrooms, labs, and offices, Soda Hall was designed with its Computer Science residents in mind: its open alcoves encourage informal interactions among students and faculty, and its labs and offices are grouped to foster a team approach to computing innovation. In Soda Hall, "the building is the computer," with advanced networking, wireless capabilities, and access to computer clusters for shared computing power,...

South Hall

Built 1873. The oldest structure on campus, and the only surviving building of the original university nucleus, South Hall was the original home of the College of Agriculture. It once had a near twin, North Hall, situated where the Bancroft Library stands today. The brick structure, designed by Scottish architect David Farquharson, is a rare and distinguished example of the Second Empire style. Over the course of its long history, South Hall has hosted the first physics lab in America (1879), the business school, a temporary museum for the state geological survey, and the persistent...

Sproul Hall

Built 1941. Robert Gordon Sproul graduated from Berkeley in 1913, then worked his way up at his alma mater from cashier to president (1930-58). Sproul was the first Berkeley alumnus and the first native Californian to serve as university president. The neoclassical building, designed by Arthur Brown, Jr., housed the offices of the chancellor and other top administrators until the 1960s, when they were repeatedly occupied by students from the Free Speech Movement. The chancellor subsequently decamped for more-secure California Hall.

Building...

Tang Center

Built 1993. A major gift from Hong Kong businessman Jack C.C. Tang, two of whose daughters graduated from Berkeley, helped fund this center for student health care. Among the services available are acute care, radiology, a pharmacy, an optometry clinic, and various counseling services.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: Two main entrances on the ground floor have automatic openers and push pads. The south facing entrance opens to Tang lot while the north facing...

Donner Laboratory

Built 1942. The lab was funded by William H. Donner, president of the Donner Steel Corp., who donated money to the university for work in nuclear medicine following his son's death from cancer. The Donner Lab was the world's first center for research in the uses of atomic energy in biology and medicine.

Building Details

Floors: 5

Accessible entrances: There are two accessible entrances. The first is from the east accessible from the Gayley Road. The second is located on the...

Cory Hall

Built 1950. Named for Clarence L. Cory, dean of the College of Mechanics and a faculty member for almost 40 years, Cory had a fifth floor added in 1985, the exterior of which features a computer chip-inspired design motif. The building houses a state-of-the-art electronic micro-fabrication facility and labs devoted to integrated circuits, lasers, and robotics. Cory has the dubious distinction of being the only site bombed twice by "Unabomber" Theodore Kaczynski in the 1980s.

Building Details

Floors: 9...

Birge Hall

Built 1964. Raymond Thayer Birge had been a professor of physics for 45 years (including 22 as department chair) when the new Birge Hall was named in his honor. Designed by John Warnecke, it replaced Bacon Hall (1881), formerly the university's elegant library and art gallery.

Building Details

Floors: 9

Accessible entrances: There is an accessible entrance on the north side of the building beneath the breezeway connecting it with LeConte. There is an automatic door opener....

Evans Hall

Built 1971. Original home of much of the computer infrastructure on campus, the building gets poor reviews because of its dark, closed-in design, its massive scale, and its unfortunate location spoiling the main east-west axis of the campus and what was intended to be a spectacular view out to the Golden Gate. Named for Griffith Evans, math department chair from 1934-49.`

Building Details

Floors: 12


Accessible entrances: There is a usable entrance on the east side of the building on level one that provides
...

Etcheverry Hall

Built 1964. The first UC-built building on the north side of Hearst Ave., it was named for Bernard Etcheverry, professor of drainage and irrigation and chairman of the department for nearly three decades. It once held a functioning nuclear reactor in its basement and a research wind tunnel, both now dismantled.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Accessible entrances: There are two entrances to the main level (level three) on the east side of the building usable from the...