A-D

Career Center (2440 Bancroft Way)

Built 1930. Students can find employment and internships through the services of the Career Center.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: There is an accessible entrace on the east side of the building.

Restrooms: There is single usable restroom.

Accessibility features: There is an accessible drinking fountain outside the restroom.

Bancroft Dance Studio (2401 Bancroft Way)

Built 1898. Began life as the First Unitarian Church, designed by A.C. Schweinfurth. It was acquired by the university in 1960 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.

Buildings Details

Floors: 2

Accessible entrances: There is an accessible entrace on the east side of the building at the top of the ramp.

Restrooms: There is an usable restroom on the ground floor.

Sutardja Dai Hall (CITRIS)

Built 2009. This 141,000-square-foot building is the headquarters of CITRIS, the multi-campus interdisciplinary research program that is one of four California Institutes for Science and Innovation. The building houses research labs, faculty offices, a nanofabrication lab, an auditorium, and a cyber café. CITRIS work aims to improve energy efficiency, transportation, environmental monitoring, seismic safety, education, cultural research and health care.

Sather Tower (Campanile)

Built 1914. Popularly known as the Campanile, the 307-foot tower is named for Jane K. Sather, designed by John Galen Howard, and built at a cost of $250,000. Its nickname derives from its resemblance to St. Mark's Campanile in Venice. The 61 bells in the carillon are played three times daily, except during exams. The four clocks, the largest in California, have 17-foot hands made of Sitka spruce and numerals of bronze. Because of the consistent temperatures on its lower floors, the Campanile also houses many of the paleontology museum's fossils.

Dwinelle Hall

Built 1952. With more than 300,000 square feet of office and classroom space, an infuriating room-numbering system, and a layout often likened to a maze, Dwinelle is the second largest building on campus. It is named for John W. Dwinelle, a UC regent, state assemblyman, and author of the 1868 "Organic Act" establishing the University of California. In the center is Ishi Court, named in honor of a Native American "found" by anthropologist Alfred Kroeber near Oroville, CA, in 1911 and brought to live in the UC Berkeley Museum of Anthropology.

Dwinelle Annex

Built 1920. Originally built for military science instruction, the building was designed by campus architect John Galen Howard. It was occupied for a quarter century by the music department (1933-58). In its current incarnation as home to the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, it is conveniently located just steps away from Zellerbach Hall and Dwinelle Hall's Durham Studio Theater.

Building Details

[under construction]

Durant Hall

Built 1911. Originally the Boalt Memorial Hall of Law, it was renamed for Henry Durant, the university's first president in 1870-72, after the law school moved to the southeast side of campus in 1951. Designed by John Galen Howard. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

[under construction]

Doe Memorial Library

Named for Charles Franklin Doe, who came from Maine in 1857 as a schoolteacher and made his fortune in California. He left a quarter of his estate to the university for construction of a new library. The Beaux Arts building, which features the magnificently restored North Reading Room and the cozy Morrison Library, was the centerpiece of architect John Galen Howard's classical campus ensemble.