South-West Campus

Dwinelle Hall

Built 1952. With more than 300,000 square feet of office and classroom space, an infuriating room-numbering system, and a layout often likened to a maze, Dwinelle is the second largest building on campus. It is named for John W. Dwinelle, a UC regent, state assemblyman, and author of the 1868 "Organic Act" establishing the University of California. In the center is Ishi Court, named in honor of a Native American "found" by anthropologist Alfred Kroeber near Oroville, CA, in 1911 and brought to live in the UC Berkeley Museum of Anthropology.

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Dwinelle Annex

Built 1920. Originally built for military science instruction, the building was designed by campus architect John Galen Howard. It was occupied for a quarter century by the music department (1933-58). In its current incarnation as home to the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, it is conveniently located just steps away from Zellerbach Hall and Dwinelle Hall's Durham Studio Theater.

Building Details

[under construction]

Alumni House

Built with funds from thousands of alumni donations, this contemporary structure along the banks of Strawberry Creek is a meeting place for alumni revisiting campus and headquarters for the California Alumni Assocation.

Building Details

[under construction]

Cesar E. Chavez Student Center

Built 1960. Named in honor of the charismatic founding president of the farm workers' union. The building was once mainly a dining commons and lounge, but in 1990 it was renovated to house various student services.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: There is an Automatic door on the basement level from MLK Student Union Garage. An automatic opener is provided on the basement level. The main entrance from Lower Sproul Plaza on level one provides...

Haas Pavilion

Built 1999. Built in 1933 as Harmon Gym; reconstructed in 1999 as Haas Pavilion, a state-of-the-art basketball arena and sports facility that preserved the intimacy, noise level, and intimidating home-court advantage of its predecessor. The 12,000-seat complex is named in honor of Walter A. Haas, Jr.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: There are two exterior entrances to the basement level on the north side, and a main entrance on the east side. The main east facing entrance is usable...

Spieker Aquatics Complex

Built 1999. Serving as home to the California water polo and swimming teams is the Spieker Aquatics Complex, one of the finest outdoor facilities in the United States. Having had a two-year hiatus due to the construction of Haas Pavilion, the Cal men's and women's water polo teams returned to full-time action at Spieker Aquatics Complex in 1999.

Building Details

[under construction]

Recreational Sports Facility (RSF)

Built 1984. Dozens of sporting opportunities under one roof: basketball, volleyball, handball, squash and racquetball courts, martial arts, weight and workout rooms, a fitness center, aerobics and dance classes, the Spieker Aquatics Complex. The $19.9 million facility was financed entirely with student registration fees.

Building Details

[under construction]

Hellman Tennis Center

Built 1983. Named in honor of former alumnus Isias Warren Hellman III, the Hellman Tennis Center is home to Cal's tennis teams. The center was built in 1983 and features five courts used for practice and home dual match competitions.

Building Details

[under construction]

Founders Building

Building Details

Floors: 1

Year built: 1993

Accessible entrances: There is a single entrance on the west side of the building.

Restrooms: There is no public restroom. The Tang Center adjacent to the building has several public and usable restrooms.

Eshleman Hall

Built 2015. ASUC Student Union, Public Service Center, Graduate Assembly, bridges Multicultural Resource Center, LEAD Center, Queer Alliance and Resource Center.

Building Details

[under construction]