U-Z

Underhill Field and Parking

Built 2008. Atop the lot, a 77,400-square-foot synthetic turf playing fieldhosts intramural sports leagues, sport club practices, and special events.

Building Details

[under construction]

Woo Hon Fai Hall

Built 1970. Woo Hon Fai Hall is the former home of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. The 103,000-square-foot concrete structure opened its doors to the public in 1970. Considered the masterpiece of San Francisco architect Mario Ciampi (1907–2006), the building is often cited as the best application of the midcentury Brutalist style to museum architecture. The building was named Woo Hon Fai Hall in 2011 in honor of the father of David Woo, a Hong Kong–based businessman and Cal alum who began his career as an architect on the Ciampi project.

Women's Faculty Club

Built 1923. The wood-framed structure designed by John Galen Howard includes living rooms, a lounge, and dining rooms.

Building Details

[under construction]

Henry H. Wheeler Brain Imaging Center

Built 1998. The Henry H. "Sam" Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center (BIC) houses one of the most powerful human research functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) system in the United States. The 4 tesla magnet provides an opportunity for research collaboration in functional neuroimaging among diverse fields. Data are analyzed at the Judy & John Webb Neuroimaging Computational Facility also housed on the Berkeley campus.

Building Details

[under construction]

Wellman Hall

Built 1912. Harry Wellman, professor of agricultural economics, was acting university president in 1967 when the building's name was changed from Agriculture Hall. Designed by John Galen Howard and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

Floors: 5

University Hall

Built 1959. This seven-story tower at the west edge of campus, designed by Welton Becet & Associates, originally housed the University of California Office of the President. When UCOP relocated to Oakland, University Hall became home to the campus's Visitor Center and a variety of administrative offices.

Building Details

[under construction]

University House

Built 1907. French architect Henri Jean Emile Benard was the winner of the university's Comprehensive Building Plan of 1900, funded by campus benefactor Phoebe Apperson Hearst. Benard collected his $10,000 prize, but declined appointment as the campus's supervising architect (balking at leaving the sophistication of Paris for Berkeley's turn-of-the-century ruggedness); University House is the only building from his plan that was actually constructed. Surrounding the stately home are extensive gardens and a large floral clock donated by the Swiss government.

Unit 3

Built 1964. Designed by John Warnecke, these four high-rise residence halls (Ida Sproul, Norton, Priestly, Spens-Black) were the last of the three Southside units to be built for the flood of 1960s students.

Building Details

[under construction]

Unit 2

Built 1960. Designed by John Warnecke, and built to accommodate the surge of new students in the 1960s. The original four high-rise residence halls (Davidson, Griffiths, Ehrman, Cunningham) were joined by two new halls, Towle and Wada, in 2005.

Building Details

[under construction]

Unit 1

Built 1960. Built to accomodate the flood of new students entering UC Berkeley in the 1960s. Designed by John Warnecke. Originally four residence halls (Cheney, Putnam, Deutsch, Freeborn), two additional residence halls (Christian and Slottman) were completed in 2005. The complex also houses the African American Theme Program (in Christian Hall) and the Disabled Students' Residence Program (in Cheney Hall).

Building Details

[under construction]