U-Z

Warren Hall (2195 Hearst Ave.)

Located at 2195 Hearst Ave, this high-tech building is home to several units of the campus’s Information Services and Technology unit, a central facility for campus IT and computing. The building provides a stable and secure home for much of the campus's data infrastructure. It was named in 2008 for the late Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Earl Warren -- a Berkeley graduate and former California governor -- after the demolition of the original Warren Hall, which was located on a nearby site.

Wheeler Hall

Named for Benjamin Ide Wheeler, university president during Berkeley's "golden years" from 1899-1919. The French Baroque facade includes arched doorways leading into a vaulted auditorium lobby, ionic columns across the middle floors, and a colonnade ornamented with urn-shaped lamps symbolizing, according to designer John Galen Howard, "the light of learning." It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Zellerbach Hall

Built 1968. The primary fine arts performance space on campus is named for Isadore and Jennie Zellerbach, who contributed $1 million toward its construction. The 2,100-seat main auditorium has witnessed performances by many of the world's most acclaimed orchestras, vocalists, dance companies, and speakers. There is also a 500-seat Playhouse for smaller productions.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Valley Life Sciences Building

Built 1930. Named not for its location but for Wayne and Gladys Valley, who contributed toward the vast building's major renovation in the early 1990s. The largest building in Berkeley (and the largest concrete building west of the Mississippi) when it was built in 1930, it remains the biggest building on campus, at over 400,000 square feet. Original exterior decorations from the George Kelham design include animal-shaped ornaments and the names of eight life science disciplines.

Wurster Hall

Built 1964. Although home to Berkeley's architecture department, Wurster is often voted Berkeley's ugliest building for its Brutalist, bare concrete appearance. But some of the "ugliness" is a result of functionality, like the concrete sunshades over windows to minimize energy costs. It was named for William Wurster, dean of the School of Architecture and its successor, the College of Environmental Design (1950-62), and his wife, lecturer Catherine Bauer Wurster.

Building Details

Floors: 11