Center Campus

Sather Tower (Campanile)

Built 1914. Popularly known as the Campanile, the 307-foot tower is named for Jane K. Sather, designed by John Galen Howard, and built at a cost of $250,000. Its nickname derives from its resemblance to St. Mark's Campanile in Venice. The 61 bells in the carillon are played three times daily, except during exams. The four clocks, the largest in California, have 17-foot hands made of Sitka spruce and numerals of bronze. Because of the consistent temperatures on its lower floors, the Campanile also houses many of the paleontology museum's fossils. Added to the National Register of...

Dwinelle Hall

Built 1952. With more than 300,000 square feet of office and classroom space, an infuriating room-numbering system, and a layout often likened to a maze, Dwinelle is the second largest building on campus. It is named for John W. Dwinelle, a UC regent, state assemblyman, and author of the 1868 "Organic Act" establishing the University of California. In the center is Ishi Court, named in honor of a Native American "found" by anthropologist Alfred Kroeber near Oroville, CA, in 1911 and brought to live in the UC Berkeley Museum of Anthropology.

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Dwinelle Annex

Built 1920. Originally built for military science instruction, the building was designed by campus architect John Galen Howard. It was occupied for a quarter century by the music department (1933-58). In its current incarnation as home to the Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, it is conveniently located just steps away from Zellerbach Hall and Dwinelle Hall's Durham Studio Theater.

Building Details

[under construction]

Durant Hall

Built 1911. Originally the Boalt Memorial Hall of Law, it was renamed for Henry Durant, the university's first president in 1870-72, after the law school moved to the southeast side of campus in 1951. Designed by John Galen Howard. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

[under construction]

Doe Memorial Library

Named for Charles Franklin Doe, who came from Maine in 1857 as a schoolteacher and made his fortune in California. He left a quarter of his estate to the university for construction of a new library. The Beaux Arts building, which features the magnificently restored North Reading Room and the cozy Morrison Library, was the centerpiece of architect John Galen Howard's classical campus ensemble. The placement of Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom, over the main entrance reflects Berkeley's aspiration to become the "Athens of the West." The building was placed on the National Register...

California Hall

Built 1905. The building began life as the campus administration building, a role to which it has somewhat returned after decades of classroom use. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

[under construction]

Bancroft Library

Built 1949. Home to many of the university Library's special collections, including one of the largest collections of Western Americana, the library was founded with Hubert Howe Bancroft's 19th century gift of his extensive library of California and Western history. The Bancroft also includes the Mark Twain Papers, the Regional Oral History Office, the University of California Archives, and other collections and artifacts. The building, designed by Arthur Brown Jr., reopened in 2009 after a major seismic upgrade; its newly renovated interior is one of the campus’s most beautiful...

Anthony Hall

Named for alumnus Earle C. Anthony, the world's most prominent Packard car dealer, who founded (in 1903) the Pelican, Berkeley's first humor magazine, during his student years.

Building Details

[under construction]

Old Art Gallery

Built 1904. Designed by John Galen Howard and originally a steam plant before being moved to its present site, the building is destined to be restored as an intimate musical performance and rehearsal space. The exterior is noted for its WPA mosaic murals depicting stret musicians and artisans.

Building Details

[under construction]

Moses Hall

Built 1931. Named for Bernard Moses, history professor from 1876-1930. The George Kelham-designed building started life as Eshleman Hall, home of the Daily Cal, before it was sold to the Regents in 1959 and renamed.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: There is a usable entrance located on the east side of the first floor.

Restrooms: The only usable restrooms are on the first floor. Location: First Floor: one across the hall...