North-Center Campus

McLaughlin Hall

Built 1931. Named for Donald McLaughlin, a professor at Harvard and Berkeley, first dean of engineering (1941-43), UC Regent (1951-67), and Peruvian gold mining tycoon. The building was designed by George Kelham and houses the main offices of the College of Engineering.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Hesse Hall

Built 1924. Designed by John Galen Howard and named for the Prussian-born founder of the College of Mechanics, Frederick Godfrey Hesse.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: One entrance (to level one) on the north side enters at grade. None of the entrances provides an automatic opener.

Restrooms: Nearest accessible restrooms are either located in McCone or O'Brien.

Giauque Hall

Built 1954. Chemist William F. Giauque won the Nobel Prize in 1949 for low-temperature research. Labs in the largely underground building conduct research into properties of matter at supercold temperatures.

Building Details

Floors: 4

Accessible entrances: The main entrance is located in the Hilderbrand Breezeway. The lab can also additionally be accessed by taking either the Latimer or Hilderbrand elevators to the basement and using a connecting tunnel.

O'Brien Hall

Built 1959. Morrough O'Brien spent two decades as an engineering professor before serving as dean of the College of Engineering from 1948-59. O'Brien Hall houses environmental engineering and the Water Resources Center Archives.

Building Details

Floors: 6

Accessible entrances: The main entrance is located on the east side in the O'Brien Breezeway. This entrance provides automatic openers and push plates.

Starr East Asian Library

Built 2008. Berkeley’s vast collection of East Asian manuscripts and artifacts -- assembled over the past century -- is housed in this library, the first freestanding structure at a U.S. university erected solely for East Asian collections. The library is home to more than 900,000 volumes, primarily in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, plus thousands of manuscripts, rubbings, and the largest and most valuable collection of historic Japanese maps outside of Japan. It is also the largest U.S. academic repository of materials on the People's Republic of China.

Blum Hall

Built 2010. The Blum Center’s home is a 22,000 square foot complex completed in 2010. The complex comprises the renovated Naval Architecture Building (designed by John Galen Howard and built in 1914), a new three-story wing and terraces, bridges and plazas connecting the complex to the College of Engineering's Sutardja Dai Hall. The center is a hub for anti-poverty innovation and is named for Richard C. Blum. The center supports faculty research aimed at creating lasting change for the poor around the world.

Haviland Hall

Built 1924. Designed by John Galen Howard and named in honor of San Francisco banker J.T.H. Haviland, whose wife donated the funds for the building. Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

Floors: 5

Accessible entrances: There is a usable entrance on the north side of building. Access is gained by navigating down to the basement level. The entrance has an automatic opener with push plates.

McCone Hall

Built 1961. Designed by John Warnecke, McCone Hall houses several academic departments in the earth sciences, as well as the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, one of the world's foremost centers for the study of earthquakes, and the Earth Sciences and Map Library. It is named for alumnus and former CIA director John McCone.

Building Details

Floors: 7

Sutardja Dai Hall (CITRIS)

Built 2009. This 141,000-square-foot building is the headquarters of CITRIS, the multi-campus interdisciplinary research program that is one of four California Institutes for Science and Innovation. The building houses research labs, faculty offices, a nanofabrication lab, an auditorium, and a cyber café. CITRIS work aims to improve energy efficiency, transportation, environmental monitoring, seismic safety, education, cultural research and health care.

North Gate Hall

Built 1906. This John Galen Howard building originally housed the School of Architecture and was affectionately called "the Ark." Added to the National Register if Historic Places in 1982.

Building Details

 [under construction]